‘Sunshine’ is Good for Us

Happy Monday to all!

There are times we fall into the trap of believing the overall message mainstream media attempts to impose on us. They often have us convinced that everyone, except ourselves, are misinformed “sheeple” and the human race is on the brink of extinction by our own hands (the latter may or may not be true…). Each network’s ideologies or agendas are enforced by showing news that adheres to a specific mindset, where chaos runs rampant in many places around the world, and where all people are a threat to either our way of living, or our lives themselves. Us here at shortlifelongroad.com also fall victim to the media’s tactics, which is probably apparent by the tone of the posts as of late, so we decided to focus on some of the good that was probably overlooked in recent days and base our discussion on positive content.

It only takes one person to inspire positive change.

Last week, it was reported that a five-year-old girl named Sunshine did something not many adults would do–she gave what little money she had to her peers, who had even less than herself. The school Sunshine attends hosts a “milk break” every day where kids take a breather from their rigorous daily learning sessions to enjoy a cup of milk and discuss nap time etiquette with their classmates (ah, to be a kid again). When she found out her friend couldn’t afford the $.45 per carton the school was charging, she was compelled to go home, crack her piggy-bank open and deposit thirty dollars in change into her friend’s milk account.

The generosity and selflessness Sunshine displayed is refreshing because most news outlets don’t report on acts of kindness, but I’m willing to bet there are more kind-hearted people out there doing good things for each other than what is presented to us in the daily news. Her big heart even inspired strangers to contribute to a milk fund via a GoFundMe page. At of the time of writing this, she has raised over $12,710!

Unfortunately, there is a downside to this post.

According to an article posted by the LA Times, there are twenty students in Sunshine’s class but only half of them can afford milk. Forty-five cents may seem inexpensive for many of us, but after a month, the total comes out to be around $180. That is a lot of money that could be spent on a small carton of milk each day, especially if someone has more than one child to worry about.

The questions I have to ask are: Why has it gotten to this point? Why are there children out there without milk? Any number of reasons could be to blame: the cost of living is too high, school is too expensive even without milk, inflation on milk prices, money going places it shouldn’t, neglectful community/government, neglectful parents., etc., etc., etc. (I try to blame parents last as circumstances are vastly different for every individual family. Financially, times are difficult and people have to do what they have to do to get by, so I blame the parents when circumstances are severe).

Something might need to change within our school systems if half the children, regardless of circumstances, can’t afford a carton of milk each day. No child should go without, ever.

As I am apt to do in these posts, I digress.

Reading the article about Sunshine’s story was a reminder of the good that people are capable of. She was a welcomed distraction to the consistent stream of hatred, fear, and violence we’ve become accustomed to reading about or seeing on a daily basis. Unfortunately, there’s an underlying story here that may be overlooked or forgotten, but if there are more people like Sunshine in the world, maybe no child–or human being for that matter–would ever have to go without again.

Did Sunshine inspire you? Do you think the state of the world is alright knowing some children have to go without while others don’t? Is it fair for the school to allow programs to give some kids milk and not others because of their economic status? What can we do about it?

Share your thoughts in the ‘Comments’ section! Don’t forget to ‘like’ and ‘share!’

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